nav
contact

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Updates

Wearing a cloth face covering may prevent you from spreading respiratory droplets. If everyone wears a cloth face covering when out in public, the risk of exposure to COVID-19 can be reduced in our community. More About Face Coverings

Our Care Options | More COVID-19 Updates 

  • KidsHealth
  • New Patient Appointments

    Locally

    336-716-WAKE

    Toll-free

    888-716-WAKE

  • Returning Patient Appointments

    Contact Clinic Directly


  • Request an Appointment Online

Do People Who Self-Injure Have to Be Hospitalized?

Do People Who Self-Injure Have to Be Hospitalized?

If someone tells a therapist or doctor about cutting occasionally to relieve stress, will they "put the cutter away" or send the person for an evaluation at a hospital?
Emmie*

When you're thinking of confiding in a therapist, doctor, or parent, it's natural to worry or wonder about what will happen next.

In almost every situation, cutting and the issues surrounding it can be cared for in a therapist's office — without going to a hospital. To set your mind at ease, tell your therapist that being hospitalized is something you are concerned about. Ask your therapist to explain to you the types of very rare occasions when someone might need to get treatment at a hospital. That should reassure you and help you feel comfortable opening up.

Telling someone about cutting can take courage, honesty, maturity, and trust. It's a healthy step that can lead to talking more about the things that stress you, receiving understanding and support, and getting the most from working with a therapist. Talking about cutting with a therapist can help a person find ways to relieve pressure and stress without self-injuring.

*Names have been changed to protect user privacy.

Reviewed by: KidsHealth Behavioral Health Experts